Monday, January 27, 2014

K 20: GUNG HAI FAT CHOY (Happy Chinese New Year!)

KINDERGARTEN LESSON PLAN                                                    Week of January 27
Lunar New Year
THIS WEEK’S TEKS:  1 a, c, f, g        Print Awareness
                                    2 b, c, e, i        Rhymes & Phonological Awareness
                                    3 a                   Phonics
                                    4 a, b               Prediction & Reading Strategies
                                    6 a,                  Story Elements
                                    7                      Poetry
                                    8 a, b               Retell Stories, Story Elements
                                    9                      Author’s Purpose
                                    10 b, c, d         Predict, Evaluate & Retell Stories
                      12 a, b               identify various forms & techniques of media
                                    18 a                 Oral & Written Conventions
                                    19 a                 Generate Questions
                                    20 a                 Whole Group Research
                                    21 a, b             Library Procedures
                        RC(fig19) a,b,d,f,e       Read Assorted Literature, Generate Questions,
Whole Group Research, Predictions/Inference,
Pair Fiction & Non-Fiction, Retell and Summarize Stories
Reading Comprehension
                                    n/a                   Book Selection

Intent: While Americans celebrate New Year on January 1 every year, many people around the world celebrate a new year when the first new moon comes around.  The Chinese, or Lunar New Year is the focus of our story time this week, and we’ll learn about Chinese culture and legends.

1. INTRODUCTION
a.      Welcome Song:  Welcome to the Library (To “London Bridge is Falling Down.”)
Welcome to the library, library, library.
Welcome to the library, please come inside and read.
We’re glad to have you here today, here today, here today.
We’re glad to have you here today, today’s a special day.

b.       Welcome Fingerplay: Rock, Scissors, Paper (To tune of Frere Jacques)
(sung)       Rock scissors paper, rock scissors paper, one two three, play with me!
(spoken)   Left hand paper, right hand paper, it’s Mickey Mouse
(sung)       Repeat refrain
(spoken)   Left hand rock, right hand paper, play catch with the ball!
(sung)       Repeat refrain
(spoken)   Right hand rock, left hand scissors, it’s an ice cream cone (scissors point up)

c.  Set Library Behavioral Expectations: (reinforce / commend examples )
ii.  Graphic CHAMPS reminder
d.       Mystery Bag Today’s surprise is a STUFFED DRAGON. What words would we use to describe this dragon? (big, scary, fierce, brave, strong, fearsome)  The dragon is the national symbol of China, and the symbol of the Chinese New Year.

e.       Word of the Week:  This week, a little change.  English and Chinese!
i.                    English Hello
ii.                  Chinese: Ni Hao
iii.                To “ The Farmer In The Dell”
Let’s wave and say Ni Hao,
Let’s wave and say Ni Hao
Let’s say HELLO to all our friends
Let’s wave and say Ni Hao.

f.        Intent & Agenda:  (Show globe) today we will learn a little about the Chinese culture and one of China’s biggest holidays, the Lunar New Year.  Most people in our country celebrate New Year on January 1, but in China and many other countries, the new year starts this Friday.  It’s also called the SPRING FESTIVAL and signals the end of winter.  First, we will watch a dragon dance, then will learn about the holiday from a boy your age who is in a dance.  Finally, we will learn how to write in Chinese and make a good-luck new year card.

2.  STORY/RESOURCE #1: (Lion Dancer: Ernie Wan’s Chinese New Year, Scholastic, 1990.)
a.  Pre-reading:   Video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UfiCxWOIGfc shows dragon dancers (approx.. 4 minutes, but it’s OK to turn it off after 1-2 minutes.)  What did you see?  Retell.  Explain to students that these dances are thought to bring good luck to anyone who sees them.  May have to explain that the dragon & lion are modeled from the same concept, a fierce animal: the terms are used interchangeably in some of the texts we see today.

b.  READ:  The photos in this book are excellent for explaining what is a truly foreign culture to many children and connecting to their lives.  Look for similarities (school, clothes, foods they eat) and be prepared to explain things that may not be familiar (NYC Chinatown, Ancestor Altar in the home…)

c.  Reflection:  What do you think it felt like to be part of that parade?  Would you want to be a Lion Dancer?

d.  Extension ActivityDRAGON, DRAGON  (to the tune of:  Twinkle, twinkle little star)
Dragon, dragon, dance around.
Dragon, dragon, touch the ground.
Dragon, dragon, shake your head.
Dragon, dragon, tongue so red.
Dragon, dragon, stamp your feet.
Dragon, dragon, coming down the street!
(match actions to words while singing)



3.  POEM:  Listen for rhyme, rhythm.  Note how events in poem were in Ernie Wan’s Lion Dancer boo, too (fireworks, red clothes., chasing lion.)  This poem is from http://www.123newyear.com/newyear-poems/chinese.html

"Gung Hay Fat Choy!"
In China, Every Girl And Boy
Celebrates The New Year
In A Very Special Way ----
With Fireworks And Dragons,
Colored Red And Gold ----
They Welcome In The New Year
And Chase Away The Old!


4.  RESOURCE #2:  (PebbleGo Social Studies: Holidays, Chinese New Year.  Accessed January 24, 2014)
a.      Pre-reading Now, we’ll look at an encyclopedia entry for this holiday and check how much we already know & maybe learn something new.
  1. READ & INVESTIGATE Resource

c.       Reflection: KWL or other thinking map to express what we learned. (Link to clipart )

d.      Extension Activity #2:  Chinese Zodiac: This is year of the HORSE, but in China, each year has a different animal as its mascot, or symbol.  This idea began a long time ago when people didn’t have numbers for the years.  They called each year by an animal’s name, and if you were born in a certain year, you were thought to be like that animal.  For example, if you were born in the year of the dragon, you were fierce and brave.  If you were born in the year of the dog, you were loyal and a good friend.  If you were born in 2007, you are probably a PIG.  Chinese people think you are dependable and will one day be rich.  If you were born in 2008, you are probably a RAT- smart and able to run fast!  We are going to do some stretches that show us about the Chinese zodiac animals now. (Find out which animal you are: http://www.china-family-adventure.com/chinese-zodiac.html) Short video explaining it: http://app.discoveryeducation.com/player/view?assetGuid=D3CDA5E8-786D-414D-A750-1A7CA3CCF094



e.      Stretches/Movement Activity: Chinese Animal Poses  (http://www.elephantjournal.com/2011/02/chinese-new-year-kids-yoga-class/)

5. ACTIVITY
a.   Horse Coloring Sheet (two varieties, children pick.)
While they color, play Tumblebooks Red is a Dragon and Round is a Mooncake on Tumblebooks http://asp.tumblebooks.com/library/asp/book.asp?id=2577 which reinforce Chinese culture theme and elements .
b.    Alternate activity: Make FU (good luck) cards


6.  Check out books (While students color & watch eBook, take small groups to check out and reinforce shelf-marker use, building autonomy: they check out from general collection next week!)

7.  Conclusion

a. Circle:
    i.  review intent: Today we learned a lot about Chinese culture.  We learned that this week marks the Chinese New Year, also called the Spring Festival, where we celebrate the end of winter.  We saw a dragon dance, learned that RED is a lucky color on New Year’s, and learned to say HELLO in Chinese, NI HAO.
    ii. For our last activity today, we are going to listen to a song that combines all those things we learned.  Ready?  http://www.nancymusic.com/Gunghayplay.htm


b.      Pet the DRAGON
c.       High Five the Word of the Week on the door on the way out. The Word of the week, written or printed on a diecut hand, is taped at kindergarten eye level .  As students leave, they can gently high-five the word to increase sight word familiarity. Horse

Chinese New Year lesson-building sites:


Dragon Dance Videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M-9nQN9arvQ (astonishing amount of firecrackers)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sKzNPxu_QBU (montage of Syndey, Australia NY festival)






Lunar New Year streamers:
Materials: popsicle sticks, roll or red and yellow streamers.
Directions: cut strips of red and yellow streamers, each about 5 inches long.
Each child can be given 3 strips of red and 2 strips of yellow streamers, along with a popsicle stick.  The child can use tape to attach the streamers to the popsicle stick.  The two colors symbolize happiness and good luck.


HORSE (2014)

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Traveling with Toddlers: My Kiddy Car Survival Pack

I have my husband the wilderness backpacker to thank for nurturing my “compact organization” compulsion.  After a cross-country road trip last summer, I can honestly say this box saved the day every day!  Pack your necessities in an 11” x 17” plastic box that fits snugly behind the driver’s seat (and makes a decent step for a toddler) and customize this list to meet your needs.

Kiddy Car Survival Pack

1.      Sunscreen.
2.     Natural Bug Repellent. (California Baby is expensive but effective!)
3.     Snacks (individually-wrapped prunes, fruit roll-ups, pretzels, nuts.)
4.     Change of clothes and a swimsuit.
5.     Kleenex, wet wipes and a hand towel, stashed in a gallon Ziploc container. (When needed, the towel also acts like a blanket!  Think Douglas Adams.)
6.     Small, used books.
7.     Pipe cleaners.  No kidding!  Make sculptures, shapes, letters… they are my kid’s favorite car toy.
8.     A small wipe-off white board and erasable marker for doodling.
9.     Water (I don’t know how you feel about bottled water, but if you are OK with it, it comes in handy.)
10.  A couple empty plastic grocery bags.

What do YOU need when you travel with kids?

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

K 19: Penguins

KINDERGARTEN LESSON PLAN                                                         Week of January 21
Penguins
THIS WEEK’S TEKS 
                                    1 a, c, f, g        Print Awareness
                                    2 b, c, e, i        Rhymes & Phonological Awareness
                                    3 a                   Phonics
                                    4 a, b               Prediction & Reading Strategies
                                    6 a,                  Story Elements
                                    7                      Poetry
                                    8 a, b               Retell Stories, Story Elements
                                    9                      Author’s Purpose
                                    10 b, c, d         Predict, Evaluate & Retell Stories
12 a, b               identify various forms & techniques of media
                                    18 a                 Oral & Written Conventions
                                    19 a                 Generate Questions
                                    20 a                 Whole Group Research
                                    21 a, b             Library Procedures
                        RC(fig19) a,b,d,f,e       Read Assorted Literature, Generate Questions,
Whole Group Research, Predictions/Inference,
Pair Fiction & Non-Fiction, Retell and Summarize Stories
Reading Comprehension
                                    n/a                   Book Selection

           
Intent: Investigate polar animals this week with a storytime about penguins.  Where do they live, what do they eat, what are they like?  Stories, songs and videos will tell us all about Penguins!




1. INTRODUCTION
a.      Welcome Song:  Welcome to the Library (To “London Bridge is Falling Down.”)
Welcome to the library, library, library.
Welcome to the library, please come inside and read.
We’re glad to have you here today, here today, here today.
We’re glad to have you here today, today’s a special day.




b.       Welcome Fingerplay & Song: Rock, Scissors, Paper (To tune of Frere Jacques)
Rock scissors paper, rock scissors paper, one two three play with me
Left hand paper, right hand paper, it’s a butterfly
Repeat refrain
Left hand rock, right hand scissors, it s a snail
Repeat refrain
Right hand rock, left hand paper, it’s a helicopter

c. Set Library Behavioral Expectations: (reinforce / commend examples)
c.       MYSTERY BAG:  Stuffed Penguin

d.  Word of the Week:  (Forms a cornerstone of the lesson, aids in understanding and connecting text themes)
i.                    English: Penguin – fairness is when things are equal, and people are playing by the rules  Say it, syllabicate it, spell it in the air.
ii.                  Spanish: ping├╝ino (pin GWEE noh)
iii.                ASL (American Sign Language.)  Sign language is a real language where people use their hands to communicate.  Hold your hands near your hips and stick them out like penguin feet.  Now “waddle” by moving your hands up and down.  http://www.signingsavvy.com/sign/PENGUIN/2077/1


f.         Intent & Agenda:  Today we are going to learn about penguins, those birds that live in the coldest part of the world, the South pole.  (Show on globe.)

2. STORY #1: Tacky the Penguin by Helen Lester, Houghton Mifflin, 1987.)
a.  Pre-reading:  Based on cover, what will story be about?

b.  READ:

c.        Reflection:  Picture walk through the story a second time, examining why the hunters chose to leave the penguins alone!

d.       Activity: Fingerplay “In the Land of Ice and Snow.
  In the land of ice and snow                            (shiver and say “brrr!” )
  Where the freezing, cold winds blow             (blow)
  Lives a bird who’s quite a sight                    (make circles w/ fingers and put to eyes like binoculars) 
  With his suit of black and white.                  (run hands along side of body, then tummy)
  He can swim, but he can’t fly.                      (swim and shake head “yes”, fly and shake head “no”)
 The penguin is a funny guy!

e.       Activity 2:  Action Song “ Did you Ever See A Penguin?”
Did you ever see a penguin, a penguin, a penguin?
Did you ever see a penguin waddle this way and that?
Waddle this way and that way, waddle this way and that way
Did you ever see a penguin waddle this way and that?

 Penguin JOKES

Who's the penguin's favorite Aunt?
(Aunt-Arctica!)
Why do penguins carry fish in their beaks?
(Because they don't have any pockets!)
What's black and white, black and white, and black and white?
(A penguin rolling down a hill!)
Which side of a penguin has the most feathers?
(The outside!)
What's black, white and red all over?
(A penguin with a sunburn!) 

3.  POEM
Penguin
I know a bird
That cannot fly:
Penguin is its name.
It cannot fly,
But it can swim
With speed that wins it fame!
I know a bird
That lives on ice
And waddles by the sea.
It looks so cute
In its black-and-white suit,
As handsome as can be!
by Meish Goldish, 101 Science Poems & Songs for Young Learners, Instructor Books



4.  Resource 2: PebbleGo Animals: Penguins   (accessed from databases January 21, 2014)
            Pre-reading: 4 types of penguins presented.  We’ll pick one.  Look at headings to show what to expect when reading.
Read:  Use vocabulary of technology, like “cursor” “webpage” “text” “graphics.”  Take time to look at definitions of unknown words and answer questions.
Reflection:  What will we do on MLK Day to make the world a more loving, kind, peaceful place (Ideas- smiling, vowing not to fight with siblings, helping parents, saying thank you and please all day, holding doors open for people, calling a loved one who lives far away, cleaning up trash, donating used goods to needy…)
Extension: I Celebrate MLK: song by “Harry Kindergarten” on You Tube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQy1o6JVPIQ accessed January 13, 2014


5. Resource #3 A Penguin Story.  Accessed from Tumblebooks, running time 3.5 minutes.


5. ACTIVITY (pick one)
 Penguin coloring page.

6.  Check out books
Continue training kids on use of shelf markers so we can graduate to shelves in next week or so.

7.  Conclusion
a. Circle:
    i.  review intent
    ii.  word of week in English, Spanish, and ASL.
iii.                closing song (stays the same all year)  open shut them open shut them raise your hands up high.  Open shut them open shut them wave and say goodbye.

b.      Line Up By… “Eye Spy” game. . . I spy someone wearing.. have kids say the child’s name, that kid can line up. 

Websites I found helpful in making this lesson:
http://www.pinterest.com/4storytime/penguins-storytime/

Additional Material:
KWL: Previous knowledge on penguins.
Video:  PebbleGo:       Polar animals (PebbleGo Animals/Polar Animals)
                                      Emperor Penguins
              Tumblebooks: Crittercam/Emperor penguins! (edit, segment only at 6:00 in…)
                                        A Penguin Story

Action Song: “Did You Ever See a Penguin?”
Did you ever see a penguin, a penguin, a penguin?
Did you ever see a penguin waddle this way and that?
Waddle this way and that way, waddle this way and that way
Did you ever see a penguin waddle this way and that?
Credit: Childhood


Fingerplay: “Two Little Penguins”
Two little penguins sitting on the ice (hold up two fingers)
One bows once, the other bows twice (made index fingers bow)
Waddle little penguins. Waddle away. (put fingers behind back)
Come back penguins. Time to play! (bring fingers to the front)
Credit: 
King County Library System




Tuesday, January 14, 2014

K18: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Birthday

There are lots of options in this story time lesson for you to adapt to your class's needs.  Songs, poems, stories, videos... because this is more academic and less "fun" than some of our weeks, have a back up plan for what to do if one segment of the story time isn't engaging the kids.               

Intent: The lasting contributions of Dr. King are the focus of this week’s lesson.  We celebrate his life in a positive way, throwing a party to thank him and celebrate his life and deeds.  Students start selecting books with shelf markers this week, too!



THIS WEEK’S TEKS:  
                                                1 a, c, f, g             Print Awareness
                                                2 b, c, e, i             Rhymes & Phonological Awareness
                                                3 a                          Phonics
                                                4 a, b                     Prediction & Reading Strategies
                                                6 a,                         Story Elements
                                                7                              Poetry
                                                8 a, b                     Retell Stories, Story Elements
                                                9                              Author’s Purpose
                                                10 b, c, d              Predict, Evaluate & Retell Stories
            12 a, b                 identify various forms & techniques of media
                                                18 a                        Oral & Written Conventions
                                                19 a                        Generate Questions
                                                20 a                        Whole Group Research
                                                21 a, b                   Library Procedures
                                RC(fig19) a,b,d,f,e           Read Assorted Literature, Generate Questions,
Whole Group Research, Predictions/Inference,
Pair Fiction & Non-Fiction, Retell and Summarize Stories
Reading Comprehension
                                                n/a                         Book Selection




1. INTRODUCTION
a.      Welcome Song:  Welcome to the Library (To “London Bridge is Falling Down.”)
Welcome to the library, library, library.
Welcome to the library, please come inside and read.
We’re glad to have you here today, here today, here today.
We’re glad to have you here today, today’s a special day.


Welcome Song 2 : Shake My Sillies Out(because we’re going to do a bit of sitting, let’s be active first!)
I’m gonna shake shake shake my sillies out,
and wiggle my worries away
(sing as many times as you need to to tire them out a little!)

c. Set Library Behavioral Expectations: (reinforce / commend examples)

NO MYSTERY BAG THIS WEEK, sorry!  Suggest an idea to me (mlynn@dentonisd.org) for next year.

e.  Word of the Week:  (Forms a cornerstone of the lesson, aids in understanding and connecting text themes)
i.                    English: FAIR – fairness is when things are equal, and people are playing by the rules  Say it, syllabicate it, spell it in the air.
ii.                  Spanish: equitativo EK-ee-ta-TEE-vo
iii.                ASL (American Sign Language.)  Sign language is a real language where people use their hands to communicate.  Here is the sign for fair, or equal:  hold your fingers out strait (so they make a 90-degree angle-model this don’t say it!) from your palms.  Now touch your fingertips together so they are level and tap twice.  That’s equal!  That’s it!  http://www.aslpro.com/cgi-bin/aslpro/aslpro.cgi

f.         Intent & Agenda:  Today we are celebrating a special birthday:  a man named Martin Luther King Jr.  Next Monday, our whole school will be closed and you will have an extra holiday, so today we will find out today who Dr. King, the person we honor next Monday, was, and we will celebrate his birthday together.

2. STORY #1: We Remember Martin Luther King, Jr.  Scholastic Weekly Readers Make-A-Book Level K, January 2003.  (Accessed January 13, 2014, from Ebsco Searchasaurus.)
a.  Pre-reading:  This is a non-fiction book: help students predict it will be about facts, not stories.   It’s also very tiny, so making multiple copies or snuggling is a good idea.

b.  READ:  illustrations are a great match to text in this book- point out examples of how people in the illustrations are doing the things mentioned in the text.

c.  Reflection:  How Are They Getting Along? The big idea of this book is about GETTING ALONG, treating each other kindly.  Look at the extension activity of pg. 8 of the book and find examples of people “getting along.”  (Sharing computer, smiling, talking to each other in a friendly way…) How do we get along with others here at school?  Ask for responses.

d.       Activity: choice of song
 May There Always be Friendship
        May there always be friendship, song and motions.

MLK Song  Sung to “Farmer in the Dell”
Oh, Martin Luther King, Oh, Martin Luther King
He said I have a dream, Oh, Martin Luther King.

Oh what is Martin’s dream?  Oh, what is Martin’s dream?
He dreams we’ll all be friends, Yes, that is Martin’s dream.



3.  POEM:  Choice from two
 (Song…) Make new friends, but keep the old, one is silver and the other gold. 
A circle is round, it has no end, that is how long I will be your friend.
            Classic song, classic rhyme.

All the Colors of the Earth by Shiela Hamanaka (William Morrow, 1994.) 
            This poem-book has great pictures and a great message- it also segues nicely into the garland activity later in the day.


4.  Resource 2: PebbleGo Social Studies: Holidays:  MLK Jr. Day   (accessed from databases January 13, 2014)
            Pre-reading: Now that we know a little about the life of MLK, let’s learn some more about the holiday
Read:  Use vocabulary of technology, like “cursor” “webpage” “text” “graphics.”  Take time to look at definitions of unknown words and answer questions.
Reflection:  What will we do on MLK Day to make the world a more loving, kind, peaceful place (Ideas- smiling, vowing not to fight with siblings, helping parents, saying thank you and please all day, holding doors open for people, calling a loved one who lives far away, cleaning up trash, donating used goods to needy…)
Extension: I Celebrate MLK: song by “Harry Kindergarten” on You Tube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQy1o6JVPIQ accessed January 13, 2014








5. ACTIVITY (pick one)
a.      Birthday Garland:  student pick a color representing all the colors of people of the world, teacher writes their wish for peace on it and connects it to the other chains in the garland.  (I have also seen this done where hands were cut out of multicolored paper and stapled together, but I didn’t find a cutout that would work at school- maybe you have one!)
c.       Ring Bells of Freedom- sing “happy birthday” to MLK, then ring bells for him.

6.  Check out books
Yay!  Students learn about shelf markers today and choose books from the specially-arranged-by-genre cart with help of the library aide.  We’re on our way to getting books the “real” way!

7.  Conclusion
a. Circle:
    i.  review intent
    ii.  word of week in English, Spanish, and ASL.
iii.                closing song (stays the same all year)  open shut them open shut them raise your hands up high.  Open shut them open shut them wave and say goodbye.

b.      Line Up By… Every week, we line up according to different criteria, makes kids pay attention, work on grouping, differentiating among options. (This week, people with Nonfiction vs. E books, SP)

Websites I found helpful in making this lesson:

Need to find another book?

Same, Same But Different

Martin’s Big Words by Doreen Rappaport.  Hyperion, 2001.  Great book, a little over the heads of a kindergarten class, but you could use it for 1st grade and up or for individual reading to your own kindergarten child.

Yo? Yes! Chris Raschka  Simple book teaches acceptance and friendship despite language barriers.
KoKo Rosemary Wells: I haven’t read this one, but the KoKo series shows diversity and multiculturalism and each book generally teachers a character lesson (lying, teasing, laziness) in a positive and gentle way.
The crayon box that talked.  Many activities about this book, making the analogy of different colors living in harmony in the crayon box, each with its own contribution.
American Holidays:  Martin Luther King Day = Celebraciones en los estados unidos:  Natalicio de Martin Luther King Jr.  Excellent bilingual book with big photos and simple words.  PebbleGo is more interactive, but if you don’t have an online encyclopedia that’s appropriate, this would be a great option.